Abschaffung des Notwehrrechts

Status
Für weitere Antworten geschlossen.

Cato

Mitglied
Auch wenns lang ist- man lasse sich das auf der Zuge zergehen- die Geschichte und Folgen der de facto Abschaffung der Notwehr mit "Dingen" (von der Schußwaffe bis zur Stricknadel) in GB.
Bitte speziell die 4 absurden Beispiele/Gerichtsurteile zu
Gemüte führen!

MfG

Cato


http://www.reason.com/0211/fe.jm.gun.shtml
Reason Magazine- November 2002


Gun Control’s Twisted Outcome. Restricting firearms
has helped make England more crime-ridden than the U.S.
by Joyce Lee Malcolm

For the better part of a century, British governments have pursued a strategy for domestic safety that a 1992 Economist article characterized as requiring "a restraint on personal liberty that seems, in most civilised countries, essential to the happiness of others," a policy the magazine found at odds with "America’s Vigilante Values." The safety of English people has been staked on the thesis that fewer private guns means less crime. The government believes that any weapons in the hands of men and women, however law-abiding, pose a danger, and that disarming them lessens the chance that criminals will get or use weapons.

In reality, the English approach has not re-duced violent crime. Instead it has left law-abiding citizens at the mercy of criminals who are confident that their victims have neither the means nor the legal right to resist them. Imitating this model would be a public safety disaster for the United States.

The illusion that the English government had protected its citizens by disarming them seemed credible because few realized the country had an astonishingly low level of armed crime even before guns were restricted. A government study for the years 1890-92, for example, found only three handgun homicides, an average of one a year, in a population of 30 million. In 1904 there were only four armed robberies in London, then the largest city in the world. A hundred years and many gun laws later, the BBC reported that England’s firearms restrictions "seem to have had little impact in the criminal underworld." Guns are virtually outlawed, and, as the old slogan predicted, only outlaws have guns. Worse, they are increasingly ready to use them.

Nearly five centuries of growing civility ended in 1954. Violent crime has been climbing ever since. Last December, London’s Evening Standard reported that armed crime, with banned handguns the weapon of choice, was "rocketing." In the two years following the 1997 handgun ban, the use of handguns in crime rose by 40 percent, and the upward trend has continued. From April to November 2001, the number of people robbed at gunpoint in London rose 53 percent.

Gun crime is just part of an increasingly lawless environment. From 1991 to 1995, crimes against the person in England’s inner cities increased 91 percent. And in the four years from 1997 to 2001, the rate of violent crime more than doubled. Your chances of being mugged in London are now six times greater than in New York. England’s rates of assault, robbery, and burglary are far higher than America’s, and 53 percent of English burglaries occur while occupants are at home, compared with 13 percent in the U.S., where burglars admit to fearing armed homeowners more than the police. In a United Nations study of crime in 18 developed nations published in July, England and Wales led the Western world’s crime league, with nearly 55 crimes per 100 people.


This sea change in English crime followed a sea change in government policies. Gun regulations have been part of a more general disarmament based on the proposition that people don’t need to protect themselves because society will protect them. It also will protect their neighbors: Police advise those who witness a crime to "walk on by" and let the professionals handle it.

This is a reversal of centuries of common law that not only permitted but expected individuals to defend themselves, their families, and their neighbors when other help was not available. A century later Blackstone’s illustrious successor, A.V. Dicey, cautioned, "discourage self-help and loyal subjects become the slaves of ruffians."

But modern English governments have put public order ahead of the individual’s right to personal safety. First the government clamped down on private possession of guns; then it forbade people to carry any article that might be used for self-defense; finally, the vigor of that self-defense was to be judged by what, in hindsight, seemed "reasonable in the circumstances."

At first police were instructed that it would be a good reason to have a revolver if a person "lives in a solitary house, where protection against thieves and burglars is essential, or has been exposed to definite threats to life on account of his performance of some public duty." By 1937 police were to discourage applications to possess firearms for house or personal protection. In 1964 they were told "it should hardly ever be necessary to anyone to possess a firearm for the protection of his house or person" and that "this principle should hold good even in the case of banks and firms who desire to protect valuables or large quantities of money."
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:

Cato

Mitglied
In 1969 police were informed "it should never be necessary for anyone to possess a firearm for the protection of his house or person." These changes were made without public knowledge or debate. Their enforcement has consumed hundreds of thousands of police hours. Finally, in 1997 handguns were banned. Proposed exemptions for handicapped shooters and the British Olympic team were rejected.

Even more sweeping was the 1953 Prevention of Crime Act, which made it illegal to carry in a public place any article "made, adapted, or intended" for an offensive purpose "without lawful authority or excuse." Carrying something to protect yourself was branded antisocial. Any item carried for possible defense automatically became an offensive weapon. Police were given extensive power to stop and search everyone. Individuals found with offensive items were guilty until proven innocent.

In the House of Lords, Lord Saltoun argued: "The object of a weapon was to assist weakness to cope with strength and it is this ability that the bill was framed to destroy. I do not think any government has the right, though they may very well have the power, to deprive people for whom they are responsible of the right to defend themselves." But he added: "Unless there is not only a right but also a fundamental willingness amongst the people to defend themselves, no police force, however large, can do it."

That willingness was further undermined by a broad revision of criminal law in 1967 that altered the legal standard for self-defense. Now everything turns on what seems to be "reasonable" force against an assailant, considered after the fact. As Glanville Williams notes in his Textbook of Criminal Law, that requirement is "now stated in such mitigated terms as to cast doubt on whether it [self-defense] still forms part of the law."

The original common law standard was similar to what still prevails in the U.S. Americans are free to carry articles for their protection, and in 33 states law-abiding citizens may carry concealed guns. Americans may defend themselves with deadly force if they believe that an attacker is about to kill or seriously injure them, or to prevent a violent crime. Our courts are mindful that, as Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes observed, "detached reflection cannot be demanded in the presence of an upraised knife."

But English courts have interpreted the 1953 act strictly and zealously. Among articles found illegally carried with offensive intentions are a sandbag, a pickaxe handle, a stone, and a drum of pepper. "Any article is capable of being an offensive weapon," concede the authors of Smith and Hogan Criminal Law, a popular legal text, although they add that if the article is unlikely to cause an injury the onus of proving intent to do so would be "very heavy."

The 1967 act has not been helpful to those obliged to defend themselves either. Granville Williams points out: "For some reason that is not clear, the courts occasionally seem to regard the scandal of the killing of a robber as of greater moment than the safety of the robber’s victim in respect of his person and property."

A sampling of cases illustrates the impact of these measures:

• In 1973 a young man running on a road at night was stopped by the police and found to be carrying a length of steel, a cycle chain, and a metal clock weight. He explained that a gang of youths had been after him. At his hearing it was found he had been threatened and had previously notified the police. The justices agreed he had a valid reason to carry the weapons. Indeed, 16 days later he was attacked and beaten so badly he was hospitalized. But the prosecutor appealed the ruling, and the appellate judges insisted that carrying a weapon must be related to an imminent and immediate threat. They sent the case back to the lower court with directions to convict.

• In 1987 two men assaulted Eric Butler, a 56-year-old British Petroleum executive, in a London subway car, trying to strangle him and smashing his head against the door. No one came to his aid. He later testified, "My air supply was being cut off, my eyes became blurred, and I feared for my life." In desperation he unsheathed an ornamental sword blade in his walking stick and slashed at one of his attackers, stabbing the man in the stomach. The assailants were charged with wounding. Butler was tried and convicted of carrying an offensive weapon.

• In 1994 an English homeowner, armed with a toy gun, managed to detain two burglars who had broken into his house while he called the police. When the officers arrived, they arrested the homeowner for using an imitation gun to threaten or intimidate. In a similar incident the following year, when an elderly woman fired a toy cap pistol to drive off a group of youths who were threatening her, she was arrested for putting someone in fear. Now the police are pressing Parliament to make imitation guns illegal.

• In 1999 Tony Martin, a 55-year-old Norfolk farmer living alone in a shabby farmhouse, awakened to the sound of breaking glass as two burglars, both with long criminal records, burst into his home. He had been robbed six times before, and his village, like 70 percent of rural English communities, had no police presence. He sneaked downstairs with a shotgun and shot at the intruders. Martin received life in prison for killing one burglar, 10 years for wounding the second, and a year for having an unregistered shotgun. The wounded burglar, having served 18 months of a three-year sentence, is now free and has been granted £5,000 of legal assistance to sue Martin.

The failure of English policy to produce a safer society is clear, but what of British jibes about "America’s vigilante values" and our much higher murder rate?

The murder rates of the U.S. and U.K. are also affected by differences in the way each counts homicides. The FBI asks police to list every homicide as murder, even if the case isn’t subsequently prosecuted or proceeds on a lesser charge, making the U.S. numbers as high as possible. By contrast, the English police "massage down" the homicide statistics, tracking each case through the courts and removing it if it is reduced to a lesser charge or determined to be an accident or self-defense, making the English numbers as low as possible.

Cultural differences and more-permissive legal standards notwithstanding, the English rate of violent crime has been soaring since 1991. Over the same period, America’s has been falling dramatically. In 1999 The Boston Globe reported that the American murder rate, which had fluctuated by about 20 percent between 1974 and 1991, was "in startling free-fall." We have had nine consecutive years of sharply declining violent crime. As a result the English and American murder rates are converging. In 1981 the American rate was 8.7 times the English rate, in 1995 it was 5.7 times the English rate, and the latest study puts it at 3.5 times.

Americans still enjoy a substantially lower rate of violent crime than England, without the "restraint on personal liberty" English governments have seen as necessary. Rather than permit individuals more scope to defend themselves, Prime Minister Tony Blair’s government plans to combat crime by extending those "restraints on personal liberty": removing the prohibition against double jeopardy so people can be tried twice for the same crime, making hearsay evidence admissible in court, and letting jurors know of a suspect’s previous crimes.

This is a cautionary tale. America’s founders, like their English forebears, regarded personal security as first of the three primary rights of mankind. That was the main reason for including a right for individuals to be armed in the U.S. Constitution. Not everyone needs to avail himself or herself of that right. It is a dangerous right. But leaving personal protection to the police is also dangerous.

The English government has effectively abolished the right of Englishmen, confirmed in their 1689 Bill of Rights, to "have arms for their defence," insisting upon a monopoly of force it can succeed in imposing only on law-abiding citizens. It has come perilously close to depriving its people of the ability to protect themselves at all, and the result is a more, not less, dangerous society. Despite the English tendency to decry America’s "vigilante values," English policy makers would do well to consider a return to these crucial common law values, which stood them so well in the past.


Joyce Lee Malcolm, a professor of history at Bentley College and a senior adviser to the MIT Security Studies Program, is the author of Guns and Violence: The English Experience, published in May by Harvard University Press.
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:

cheez

Mitglied
das heisst also unter anderem, dass ich in england keine messer tragen darf, richtig ? weil "offensive weapon". gilt das auch heute immer noch ? dürfen dann in england überhaupt messer verkauft werden ? wie trägt man sie vom laden nach hause ? wie befördert sie der postbote ?

ich war vor kurzem in london, und hatte vorher gefragt (englisch-lehrer) ob ich mein messer mitnehmen dürfte, und dies wurde bejaht. wie man sich täuschen kann. gott sei dank hat kein mensch mein afck-2 gesehen.

cheez
 

TheLonestar

Mitglied
Ja, die Engländer

Guter Beitrag, Cato!

Aber zuviel Text für die meisten, schätze ich..


So weit ist es nun gekommen mit den Engländern.

Meine besten Wünsche all denen in Great Britain die sich kein X für ein U vormachen lassen.

Wenn es bei uns so weit kommt wander ich aus.:angry:



Viel Spaß im Pub, wünscht

Lone
 

aqua

Mitglied
Tja, auch wenn, wie auch mal hier im Forum geäussert wurde, wir angeblich ein viel zu strenges Notwehrrecht hätten, so stimmt das mit Sicherheit nicht! Das Notwehrrecht in Deutschland ist eigentlich einzigartig. Es gibt fast nirgends ein so weitreichendes Notwehrrecht wie in Deutschland. Wo sonst ist es erlaubt, wenn alle anderen Mittel versagen, den Angreifer sogar zu töten und das sogar bei Angriffen, die sich bloss auf Vermögenswerte beziehen? Dabei ist das Alles nur aus dem einfachen Grundsatz hergeleitet, dass das Recht dem Unrecht nicht zu weichen braucht und dass der in Notwehr Handelnde, durch seine Verteidingungshandlung nicht nur sein Rechtsgut schützt, sondern gleichzeitig für den Erhalt der gesamten Rechtordnung eintritt.
Da sich aber das Notwehrrecht der BRD sehr bewährt hat (und übrigens andere Länder Teile daraus in ihr eigenes Rechtssystem übertragen haben) wird daran wohl nix gerüttelt werden.
 

Cato

Mitglied
Naja, das imprägniert leider nicht auf alle Zeit- auch das englische Notwehrrecht war einmal recht vernünftig. In Deutschland ist es dem Normalbürger schon unmöglich Schußwaffen zum Selbstschutz in den eigenen vier Wänden zu besitzen. Es gibt immer mehr Verbote von "gefährlichen Gegenständen", Messergesetze, Einschränkung der Notwehr durch Rechtssprechung, etc.- IMHO geht der Trend in Richtung Großbritannien.

Momentan laufen in den beiden fortschrittlichsten Gesellschaften
eben zwei riesige "Feldversuche" in Sachen Sicherheitspolitik.
In den USA in
-Richtung liberalerer Waffentragebestimmungen, aber
-"zero tolerance" gegen Mißbrauch des staatlichen Vertrauens mit
Maßnahmen "three steps and you are out"(= drei Gewaltverbrechen
führen automatisch zu einer lebenslangen Haft);
- Ziel der Gerichte ist es primär die Gesellschaft zu schützen
nicht die Täter zu therapieren.

In Europa (plus Commonwealthstaaten) hingegen mit dem
-Versuch alle gefährlichen Gegenstände (vom Messer über die
Schußwaffe bis zu Hunden) wegzuregeln (gegen das
Selbstschutzbedürfnis der Bevölkerung) da diese verantwortlich
für das Gewaltproblem seien.
-den Polizeiapparat aufzublähen und mit immer neuen Kompetenzen zu
betrauen, damit er nur alle Zeit jeden Bürger schützen kann ( die
Privatsphäre muß dabei leider gegen die Sicherheit eigetauscht
werden/zB. Kamerasysteme die ganz London überwachen- siehe dazu
etwa die Werke Rolf Gössners );
-andererseits aber mit Gewaltkriminellen möglichst behutsam zu
verfahren um sie möglichst bald wieder in die Gesellschaft zu integrieren;

Momentan siehts so aus, als ob wir hier damit furchtbar "einfahren" würden....

MfG

Cato
 

HankEr

Super Moderator
Resozialisierung und Schutz der Gesellschaft schließen sich ja in keinster Weise gegenseitig aus. Soziale straffällig gewordene Underdogs ein paar Jahre weckstecken und sie sich dort sich und ihren Mitsträflingen selbst zu überlassen kann wohl kaum ein Weg in Richtung "Schutz der Gesellschaft" sein. Jeden Ladendieb Lebenslänglich oder Totesstrafe aufzubrummen scheint auch wenig sinnvoll zu sein.

Und was Wegfall von Freiheitsrechten und Überwachungsstaat anbelangt, das brauchst Du nicht bei Europa/Commenwealth erwähnen und bei den USA auszusparen. Welche Freiheitsrechte gibt es denn in den USA die es z.B. in D nicht gibt? Keine Meldepflicht/kein Ausweis, ein verfassungsgemäß verankerstes Recht auf Waffen, was noch? Dafür mußt Du z.B. um Deine Exitenz bangen wenn Du Deine eigenen Kinder photographierst wenn sie nicht vollständig bekleidet sind :irre:
 

Cato

Mitglied
Original geschrieben von HankEr
Resozialisierung und Schutz der Gesellschaft schließen sich ja in keinster Weise gegenseitig aus.

Bei Sexualstraftäter und habituellen Gewalttätern schon. In den USA heißt es "three strikes and you are out"= drei Gewaltverbrechen bedeuten automatisch lebenslang. Daher auch die Sensationsschlagzeilen hierzulande "wegen Pizzaraub lebenslänglich" oder "wegen Tierquälerei lebenslänglich". Drei vorsätzliche Gewaltdelikte kann man nicht aus Versehen begehen. Was passier bei uns? Der typische Discoschläger hat ein ellenlanges Vorstrafenregister, tritt immer wieder mal eine einige Monate dauernde Haftstrafe an, kommt aber immer wieder raus. Jede Chance für ihn bedeutet ein Opfer. Begeht er seine Tat mit Hund, Messer oder Schußwaffe wird nach Verboten geschrieen. "Etwas" pervers- oder?
In den USA weiß man dagegen sehr gut, daß nicht das Tatmittel den Mörder macht.


Welche Freiheitsrechte gibt es denn in den USA die es z.B. in D nicht gibt? Keine Meldepflicht/kein Ausweis, ein verfassungsgemäß verankerstes Recht auf Waffen, was noch?

Naja, Sachen wie der "freedom of information act" sind auch ganz nett, aber hier muß man die Wirklichkeit vom Anspruch trennen. Formell steht Deutschland oder Europa (bis auf England, wo es ja keine niedergeschriebene Verfassung/Grundrechtskatalog gibt) ganz gut da.

Aber der Lack ist schnell ab- wie man bei den Landeshundeverordnungen gesehen hat. Oder auch in der RAF Hysterie, als Franz Josef Strauß gefangene Terroristen standesrechtlich erschießen lassen wollte!
Was glaubst Du, wo würden unsere Grundrechte sein, wenn der 11.9. sich bei uns zugetragen hätte? Glaubst Du im Ernst da würde noch diskutiert werden? In Österreich wurden Lauschangriff und Rasterfahndung nach der Briefbombengeschichte (Nazi versandte Bomben) eingeführt- und natürlich nie wieder abgeschafft, auch als der Typ schon geschnappt war. Und in den USA wird heftig gestritten, was noch machbar ist und was in den Polizeistaat führt.
Wie meinte Univ.Prof. Casazar (IWÖ Präsident und seit 20 Jahren Professor an der juridischen Fakultät Wien) so schön auf die Frage ob die diversen Waffenverbote in GB oder das angestrebte Verbot in Österreich, bzw. die Umsetzung nicht gegen die Verfassung sei: "Die Verfassung könnens ihnen in die Haare schmieren".

Wir haben eben kaum Rechtskultur oder ein Grundrechtsbewußtsein- Grundrechte werden als entbehrlicher Luxus gesehen, weil "ich bin eh kein Verbrecher". In den USA weiß dagegen auch der Dümmste in etwa was in den Amandments verankert ist- da wird das Auftreten den Behörden gegenüber ein anderes. Generell empfindet sich der Ami nicht als Untertan, sondern als Bürger, dessen Rechte nur vom Staat verwaltet nicht aber garantiert werden- weil sie ja "God given" sind. War ja auch interessant die Aufregung der "Volksvertreter" auf die Waffen Online/Visier Briefaktion. Die mucken plötzlich auf die Normunterworfenen- Frechheit! Während die deutsche Exekutive primär ohne groß nachzudenken vollzieht, hab ich in den USA desöfteren von Cops gehört "wenn die ein Gesetz gegen die Verfassung machen, könnens das allein umsetzen".

Der US Verfassungsgerichtshof urteilt beinhart im Sinne der Verfassung- und in der Regel gegen die jeweils herrschende Regierung (so schmetterte er zB. Reagans Vorstoß gegen die Abtreibung ab). In Europa dagegen liegt die Klage der britischen Waffenbesitzer schon seit längerem beim EuGH, werden die diversen Hundeverordnungen von Verfassungsgerichten bestätigt. Glaubst Du im Ernst die würden aufgehoben werden weil sie sachlich nicht zu halten sind? Nö, interessiert doch keinen- gegen den "politischen Konsens" wird nur sehr selten geurteilt.


Dafür mußt Du z.B. um Deine Exitenz bangen wenn Du Deine eigenen Kinder photographierst wenn sie nicht vollständig bekleidet sind :irre:

Und hierzulande muß ich als Pensionist mit der Erschießung durch ein SEK rechnen... Bedauerliche Einzelfälle gegeneinander aufzurechnen, bringt wenig.
Fakt ist, daß jedes dritte Kind mißbraucht wird- und hierzulande nur zu oft weggesehen wird. In den USA ist das Gegenteil der Fall- dort ist man schon übervorsichtig. Was richtiger ist, kann wohl niemand sagen.

MfG

Cato
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:

HankEr

Super Moderator
In den USA heißt es "three strikes and you are out"= drei Gewaltverbrechen bedeuten automatisch lebenslang.
Ja, da habe ich kein Problem damit. Es geht mir um die Unterschiede im Strafvollzug bei Ersttätern.
In den USA weiß man dagegen sehr gut, daß nicht das Tatmittel den Mörder macht.
... und warum sind dort die Gesetze für Messer in den meisten Regionen wesentlich schärfer als bei uns? Warum gibt es in den meisten Schulen ein Verbot jeglicher Waffen und waffenähnlicher Gegenstände? Was ist das für eine Gesellschaft in der man mitunter wegen eine Nagelfeile von der Schule fliegen kann? Welche Chancen bleiben da für den Ersttäter?

Naja, Sachen wie der "freedom of information act" sind auch ganz nett, aber hier muß man die Wirklichkeit vom Anspruch trennen.
Eben. Aber Du hast recht, solches Zensurgehabe wie in Nordrhein-Westfalen gibt es dort (denke ich) nicht.

Was glaubst Du, wo würden unsere Grundrechte sein, wenn der 11.9. sich bei uns zugetragen hätte? Glaubst Du im Ernst da würde noch diskutiert werden?
Ich konnte nicht feststellen, daß in USA groß diskutiert worden ist. Das sind dch auch alle auf den Zug gesprungen um nur nicht als Verhinderer des heilgen Kreuzzuges gegen den Terror dazustehen.
... kanst Du ja kaum als Beispiel größerer Freiheitsrechte in den USA als in Europa anführen ...

Generell empfindet sich der Ami nicht als Untertan, sondern als Bürger, dessen Rechte nur vom Staat verwaltet nicht aber garantiert werden- weil sie ja "God given" sind.
Am Land mag das so sein ...

Nö, interessiert doch keinen- gegen den "politischen Konsens" wird nur sehr selten geurteilt.
Aha, habe ich beim Bundesverfassungsgericht (D) noch nicht festgestellt. Wie das in Österreich ist weiß ich nicht.
 

TacHead

Mitglied
All zu viel will ich gar nicht sagen, die Positionen sind ja im wesentlichen bekannt - interessanter Artikel jedenfalls :super: und der Replik von HankEr kann ich mich nur anschließen - einschließlich dem Photographie-Beispiel :irre:

Auch wenn D im europäischen Vergleich noch recht gut dasteht teile ich den Eindruck, dass es hierzulande kein ausgeprägtes Staatsbürgerbewußtsein gibt (was auch in anderen Bereichen Probleme verursacht). Aber: die Engländer haben das, was hat's geholfen?

Man mag die Amerikaner um ihr Selbstbewußtsein und ihren Verfassungsstolz (den sie oft heillos und an ihren Problem vorbei überziehen) beneiden - beides hat aber nicht ein katastrophales Bildungsniveau, Auflösung der sozialen Kohärenz und die Ausbreitung z.T. wahnwitziger politischer und religiöser Vorstellungen, die ein einfach nur noch krankes Ausmaß von Ignoranz, Heuchelei, Doppelmoral und brutaler, rücksichtsloser Machtarroganz mit sich gebracht haben, verhindern können. Staatsbürgerdenken, Verfassungspatriotismus und das Recht, Waffen zu tragen, reichen eben nicht aus, um eine lebenswerte Gesellschaft sicherzustellen.

Amerika als Vorbild? Njet.

Mehr Staatsbürger- und Rechtsstaatsbewußtsein hierzulande gegen die fortschreitende Lobbyisierung, Bevormundung und Aushebelung von persönlichen und sozialen Grundrechten? Yes please.
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:

El Dirko

Mitglied
Ähm, zurückgegangene Straftaten in Amerika sind vorallem dort aufgetreten wo durch Sozialarbeit und dem Moddell das die Polizei wieder Bürgernähe aufnimmt das soziale Klimma verbessert wurde.
Die Programme "three strikes" und "No Tolleranz" haben keine Effecte gezeigt genauso wenig wie die Todesstrafe einen Effekt zeigt.
Wer Verbrechen begeht tut dies in der (zugegebener maßen falschen) Annahme NICHT erwischt zu werden. Harte Strafen schrecken daher kaum ab. Sie befriediegen lediglich die Rachegefühle der Opfer.
Unser Strafsystem, in dem ein Straftäter nicht aus Rache aufgegeben wird, ist IMHO eine der größten Leistungen die eine tolerannte Gesellschaft leisten kann. Wir sollten stolz darauf sein und mehr Geld in Soziale Vorsorge, Ausbildung etc. stecken und nicht wie die Ammis Millionen in immer mehr Gefängnisse stecken.
Gruß
El
 

TacHead

Mitglied
@El Dirko: so isses :)
Das "Wegsperren" (Scheißvokabel) von hoffnungslosen Fällen oder von Gewalttätern mit hoher Wiederholungswahrscheinlichkeit schließt das ja nicht aus. Die Politiker hantieren halt auf beiden Seiten mit möglichst "reinen" Ideologien um mit knackigen Slogans fischen gehen zu können. Es hat mir noch nie eingeleuchtet warum sich Prävention/Resozialisation und Sicherheitsverwahrung als fallabhängige Optionen innerhalb des gleichen Vollzugsystems ausschließen sollen. Etwa nur weil dann nicht mehr alles bequem schwarz-weiß ist?

Was das Notwehrrecht und die entsprechenden Gerichtsverfahren betrifft fühle ich mich in D auch wesentlich besser aufgehoben und sehe das (bislang :ack: ) auch nicht durch ein noch so unsinniges Verbot von potentiell geeigneten Gegenständen gefährdet. Richtig kritisch wird es erst, wenn an den zugrundeliegenden Rechtsgrundsätzen wie "Recht muß Unrecht nicht weichen" gefeilt wird oder die reale Rechtsprechung systematisch gegen sie verstößt. Ist m.E. noch nicht der Fall und möge so bleiben.
 

Cato

Mitglied
@El Dirko: Ähmn, lieferst Du uns auch irgendeinen Anhaltspunkt, daß es polizeilich-gesellschaftlicher Kuschelkurs war, der die Kriminalität zurückgehen ließ, oder ist das mehr persönliche Philosophie garniert mit Wunschdenken?

"Zero tolerance", also das harsche Ahnden selbst kleinster Verstöße, ist zwar nicht unbedingt nach meinem Geschmack, wirkt aber- siehe New York. Fakt ist, dass Raubtaten seit Anfang der 90er Jahre um 17 % zurückgegangen sind, Tötungsdelikte wurden halbiert, die Aufklärungsraten steigen erheblich. Wie gesagt, ich bin kein Fan davon, aber immer noch bessere als "zero tolerance" gegen "potentielle Waffen" wie es in Europa betrieben wird.

Und "three strikes" garantiert, daß ein Täter nach drei Gewaltdelikten nicht noch weitere Opfer verursacht. Das IST Spezialprävention (=dieser Täter begeht keine Tat mehr) pur und entsteht nicht aus dem Bedürfnis nach Rache, sondern aus dem die Gesellschaft schützen zu wollen. Welche Rechtfertigung sollte es auch geben einem habituellen Täter weitere Chancen einzuräumen? Und wenn das bedeutet, daß man mehr Gefängnisse bauen muß- die Behandlungskosten der Opfer summieren sich ungleich mehr. Besser als wegsehen und bei jeder Wiederholungstat bestürtzt den Kopf schütteln-"war nicht verhinderbar". IST es aber! Der Typ in Hamburg dessen Hund das Kind getötet hat, war 18 (!!) mal vorbestraft u.a. wegen illegalen Waffenbesitz, Drogenhandel, Körperverletzung, etc. Toll, was? In den USA wäre der also schon längst hinter Gittern verschwunden- ergo wäre der kleine Junge noch am Leben. Aber Überraschung, im perversen Europa kommt dieses "wertvolle Mitglied der Gesellschaft" wieder raus. Begeht er dann die nächste Tat mit einer Schußwaffe, schreien vermutlich alle Medien nach einem Totalverbot von Schußwaffen.

Noch schlimmer ist die Sache in punkto Sexualstraftäter. Bei bis zu 100% Rückfallquote (sadistische Sexualstraftäter- Studie Mag. Müller/österr. Polizeipsychologe &Profiler) frage ich mich schon, wie man da etwas von "größten Leistungen" und "toleranter Gesellschaft" faseln kann. Es geht hier nicht um Apfeldiebe oder sonstige Vermögensdelikte- bei denen ist Einsperren sogar meist kontraproduktiv- sondern um Delikte wo bei jeder Tat ein Leben, mindestens aber eine Seele zerstört wird.
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:

Hayate

Mitglied
Fest steht doch , daß die Regierungen des Empire und der USA elementare Bürgerrechte mißachten und untergraben und dadurch das Gleichgewicht der Kräfte in Staat und Gesellschaft gefährlich verschieben.
Während in England die Abschaffung der Notwehr und Einrichtung permanenter (und im übrigen nutzloser) Videoüberwachung an der Rechtssicherheit Zweifel aufkommen läßt, sind in den USA mit ihren (laut Verfassung sehr weitreichenden) Freiheitsrechten die eher pekuniär als an der Wahrheit orientierte Strafechtsprechung und die erwiesenen systematischen Verstöße von Organen der Staaatsmacht gegen formal anerkannte Rechtsgrundlagen zu nennen.
( Beispiele hierfür sind z.B die Nichteinhaltung der ratifizierten Wiener Konsularrechtskonvention, die von höchster Stelle angeordnete wochenlange Arrêtierung von Personen ohne richterlichen Beschluß oder Anklage sowie die Ignoranz gegenüber den Prinzipien der Gewaltenteilung, die sich in nichts besser ausdrückt als in der Einrichtung des Ministeriums zur Verteidigung des Heimatbodens.)

Rein juristisch wäre ich mit den Rechten, die die U.S. Verfassung in Kombination mit den internationalen Verträgen garantiert, völlig zufrieden. Die Exekutive der USA garantiert diese Rechte aber nicht.

Die Rechte, die im Grundgesetz verankert sind, sind mir aber auch recht, wobei ich mir eine Positivdefinition des Notwehr- und Waffentragerechts wünschen würde. Obwohl auch in unserem Staat an den Bürgerrechten gesägt wird ( hier sei exemplarisch nur mal das sich pestilenzartig verbreitende Prinzip des Generalverdachts genannt), ist bei uns sowohl die Diskrepanz zwischen Verfassung und Wirklichkeit als auch die absolute Wirklichkeit IMHO erträglich.

Unbestreitbar ist, daß man in Deutschland seiner Rechte sicherer und weniger durch Verbrechen gefährdet ist, als in den meisten anderen Staaten der Erde. Zudem ist unsere Justiz in Strafsachen als vergleichsweise zuverlässig anzusehen.
Bei aller Fehlbarkeit des deutschen Staates muß man doch anerkennen, daß die Situation in kaum einem anderen Staat besser ist.
 

El Dirko

Mitglied
Meine Informationen Stammen aus einer Internationalen Untersuchung über Kriminatlität aus diesem Jahr, vorgestellt in "10 nach 10" die Quelle wurde angegeben, habe ich mir aber natürlich nicht gemerkt. :D
New York wurde ausdrücklich erwähnt: Als Beispiel dafür dass enger Polizeikontakt zur Bevölkerung weniger Straftaten zur Folge hat. Gleichzeitig wurde bestritten das sich nachweisen läßt das "Sero Tolerance" etwas gebracht hätte. Klang für mich seriös, klar ist dies eher ein linkes Magazin, aber IMHO behaupten sie keinen Scheiß.
Wenn ich dafür jetzt nicht tausende Beweise habe sry, aber ich füre da kein Buch drüber. :D
Eine eigene Begründung steht in meinem Thread: Warum soll sich ein Straftäter mit seiner Bestrafung auseinandersetzen? Solch ein Verhalten dürfte sehr selten sein da Staftäter meist spontan und/oder dumm sind. Außerdem verdrengt man "eventuelle" unangenehme Folgen lieber und geht von einem Erfolg aus.
Weiterhin habe ich nie davon gesprochen einen Schmusekurs gegenüber Sexualstraftäter etc zu fahren. Das hat aber IMHO nichts mit "sero tolleranze" zu tun, denn bei diesem Konzept geht es ja gerade um "Apfeldiebe".
@TacHead Du hast verstanden was ich meinte. :)
Gruß
El
 
--quote:
Der Typ in Hamburg dessen Hund das Kind getötet hat, war 18 (!!) mal vorbestraft u.a. wegen illegalen Waffenbesitz, Drogenhandel, Körperverletzung, etc. Toll, was? In den USA wäre der also schon längst hinter Gittern verschwunden- ergo wäre der kleine Junge noch am Leben.
------------
In diesem Punkt muß ich Cato beipflichten. Wenn man die sogenannten Vielfachtäter gleich aus dem Verkehr ziehen würde, wäre das bestimmt nicht verkehrt. Für ihren Unterhalt muß die Allgemeinheit ohnehin aufkommen. Und im Knast (nicht: Hotelbetrieb mit Wochenendausgang) können sie zumindest nicht mehr soviel Schaden anrichten.
Na ja, erfahrungsgemäß werden die US-Trends mit zehn Jahren Verzögerung von uns übernommen. Und das "Zero Tolerance"-Konzept New Yorks wäre einen Versuch wert. Mit "Weicheiern" aller Art und leeren Haushaltskassen wird das aber nichts. Die Rechnung zahlen die "sheeple".
 

pitter

Forumsbetreiber
Teammitglied
Original geschrieben von Cato
"Zero tolerance", also das harsche Ahnden selbst kleinster Verstöße, ist zwar nicht unbedingt nach meinem Geschmack, wirkt aber- siehe New York. Fakt ist, dass Raubtaten seit Anfang der 90er Jahre um 17 % zurückgegangen sind, Tötungsdelikte wurden halbiert, die Aufklärungsraten steigen erheblich.

Das ist kein Argument das weisst Du auch. Wenn seit Anfang der 90e r der Cola Konsum gestiegen ist, gleichzeitig die Anzahl der Straftaten zurückgeht, lässt sich auch kein Zusammenhang konstruieren. Da müssten genauso die Bevölkerungsentwicklung, Veränderungen im sozialen Gefüge, Änderungen im Bildungswesen, im Sozialwesen berücksichtigt werden. Vieleicht ist die Polizei stärker präsent, oder es wird nicht mehr so viel zur Anzeige gebracht oder man vertriebt alle Kriminellen aus der Stadt, der Statistik wegen ;) Da gibts soviele Faktoren, ist ja nicht so, dsas sich 10 Jahre nichts geändert hat und nur die "Zero Tolerance" Politik dazukam.

Zero Toleranz ist Schwachsinn. Eine Strafe muss im Verhältnis zur Tat stehen. Und bei Wiederholungstätern natürlich anders als bei Ersttätern. Genau das Prinzip haben wir doch in D auch. Wozu und was soll ich da ändern? Das Straffmass? ACK, aber da brauch ich doch kein neues Prinzip fuer.

"Three Strikes" - Soll das was ganz neues sein? Ein zweimal vorbestrafter Gewalttäter bekommt bei uns auch keine Kuschelbehandlung. Ich geb Dir ja gerne recht, dass man das mögliche Strafmass gerade bei Gewaltdelikten auch ausschöpfen muss und auch wenn ich vorsichtig bin, Fälle einzuschätzen, deren "Details" man in der Presse liest, sie zeigen IMO trotzdem, dass man immer noch zusehr den Täter und nicht die Opfer im Blick hat. Nur ändert sich das in den Köpfen, oder eben nicht. Ein anderes Rechtssystem bringt da wenig. Und brauchts auch nicht. Mehrfachtäter könnte man auch bei uns in Sicherheitsverwahrung nehmen.


Gruesse
Pitter
 

TacHead

Mitglied
"Three strikes" und Notwehr

Dass habituelle Gewalt-/Triebtäter nicht wieder auf die Gesellschaft losgelassen werden dürfen und "Opferschutz vor Täterrechten" keine rechte Parole sondern ein essentielles Element von Gerechtigkeit ist versteht sich doch von selbst.

Das Problem, dass ich mit "three strikes" und "zero tolerance" habe ist die simplizistische Schwarz-Weiß-Malerei (die ja nicht nur bei den Amis, sondern z.B. bei der CS-Union weit verbreitet ist). Es sind Floskeln, die sich verbohrten Law-and-Order-Fetischisten leicht einprägen und einen logisch-leichten Weg zur Friede-Freude-Eierkuchen-Welt suggerieren wenn man alle Bösen einfach einsperrt. So leicht ist es aber nicht, und gerade Leuten, die sich mit Notwehr befassen, sollte klar sein, dass gerade die Entscheidung über "Gewaltverbrechen" oder "Selbstverteidigung" stark von der persönlichen AUffassung und (Un-)Informiertheit des Richters und selten sonderlich zuverlässigen Zeugenaussagen abhängt. Wenn dann ein "three strikes"-Automatismus ohne genaue Überprüfung der einzelnen Fälle und Personen greift ist man unvermeidlich null komma nix bei Justizirrtümern die das Leben von Leuten zerstören die ihr Leben oder das eines Mitmenschen schützen wollten.
 

Cato

Mitglied
Re: "Three strikes" und Notwehr

Original geschrieben von TacHead
Dass habituelle Gewalt-/Triebtäter nicht wieder auf die Gesellschaft losgelassen werden dürfen und "Opferschutz vor Täterrechten" keine rechte Parole sondern ein essentielles Element von Gerechtigkeit ist versteht sich doch von selbst.

Sollte man meinen - die Realität sieht allerdings anders aus. In einer Übung aus praktischem Strafrecht hatte ich ca. 100 (anonymisierte) Akten zu bearbeiten, die von dem Richter als repräsentativ ausgeteilt wurden. Ellenlange Strafregister waren da die Regel, ganz typisch: "Sachbeschädigung als Jugendlicher- Diversion-Körperverletzung-bedingte Haftstrafe- Ablauf selbiger-Nötigung-zwei Monate Haft-Tierquälerei-Geldstrafe-Raufhandel-1 Jahr Haft-3 Jahre Pause-Vergewaltigung-2 Jahre Haft", etc. etc. Begeht der Typ aber einen Bankraub mit einer Spielzeugpistole, ist von 5-10 Jahren alles drin. Da stimmt doch die Gewichtung hinten und vorne nicht. Unsere Rechtssprechung/Gesellschaft sieht obigen Typ als "Tunichtgut" oder "Bücher", aber denkt gar nicht daran sich mal die Frage zu stellen, ob man nicht irgendwann eine Grenze ziehen sollte. Wäre schön, wenn nicht immer zuerst ein schwerverletztes/getötetes/mißbrauchtes Opfer draufzahlen müßte....


Notwehr [...] ein "three strikes"-Automatismus [...] das Leben von Leuten zerstören die ihr Leben oder das eines Mitmenschen schützen wollten.

Du wirst mir zustimmen, daß es schon extrem unwahrscheinlich ist, dreimal in eine extrem diffuse Situation zu kommen, die dann auch nicht mehr als Notwehrüberschreitung gesehen wird. Auch angesichts dessen, daß von den 2 Mio. Fällen bewaffneter Notwehr in den USA über 90% ohne Verletzung des Täters enden. Und angesichts dessen, daß meist anhand der Lebensgeschichte der Involvierten auch in diffusen Situationen einige Schlüsse möglich sind. Vielleicht müßte man die Sorge hier im täterfreundlichen Europa haben, drüben ist sie ziemlich unberechtigt.

MfG

Cato
 

TacHead

Mitglied
Re: Re: "Three strikes" und Notwehr

Original geschrieben von Cato
Wäre schön, wenn nicht immer zuerst ein schwerverletztes/getötetes/mißbrauchtes Opfer draufzahlen müßte....
[...]
Und angesichts dessen, daß meist anhand der Lebensgeschichte der Involvierten auch in diffusen Situationen einige Schlüsse möglich sind.

Da kann ich Dir auch aus leidvoller persönlicher Erfahrung nur zustimmen. Aber man kann Verbrechen erst bestrafen wenn sie begangen wurden, und dann ist es - zumindest für das erste Opfer - zu spät. Es gibt keinerlei rechtsstaatliche Möglichkeit daran was zu ändern. Deshalb die Prävention als Schlüssel zu mehr Sicherheit als mein persönliches "ceterum censeo" ;) - Einsperren ist für *alle* Beteiligten höchstens die zweitbeste (aber manchmal unvermeidliche) Lösung.

Zum zweiten Punkt: wertgeleitete Schlüsse oder Beurteilungen einer Person/Situation drängen sich immer auf, aber die Unterstellung von Intentionen im konkreten Fall aufgrund individueller Beurteilung einer Person und/oder vorangegangener Verfehlungen ist rechtsfehlerhaft. Auch ein mehrfach Vorbestrafter kann bei einer gewaltsamen Auseinandersetzung mit einem (bis dahin) gesetzestreuen Bürger im Recht sein.
Ich stimme Dir natürlich zu, dass es mehr als unwahrscheinlich ist dass jemand dreimal unschuldig verurteilt wird.
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:
Status
Für weitere Antworten geschlossen.